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Under pressure… don’t let it push down on you

Finding new ways to ease the tension of work-related pressure can play a key role in consistent job performance.

By Aaron Hart, BDR

M Sales Growth Advisors


When working in sales, we often face multiple stressors throughout the week. Whether it's an important phone call with a prospect, a dire email from a client, or a sales update meeting with the boss, feeling the pressure to consistently perform at a high level is a reality for each and every sales pro out there.


However, this pressure is absolutely normal and, if managed correctly, should be a welcomed component of the job. Instead of treating this like an uphill battle, we can leverage it to help prepare us for overcoming the challenges we encounter throughout our career.


For many, the key to success in sales is harnessing your nerves and actually utilizing them as a benefit. The reality is that no matter our level of experience (sales newbie or veteran), we all get nervous in anticipation of a big call or meeting. How we approach the situation is what lays the groundwork for success.


Shift your mindset

Some pressure can act as a great motivator for salespeople, driving higher activity and results. In order to take advantage of this nervous energy and benefit from it, it’s important to frame each task or event in a positive light.


View that next pressure-packed meeting as a new opportunity, rather than a threat. By changing your perspective surrounding what can sometimes be the hardest aspect of the job, you can better mentally and physically prepare yourself to achieve the desired outcome.


Keeping your cool during high stress moments keeps anxiety at bay, leaving your mind clear and focused. So, take a few deep breaths, relax, and go into your meetings with confidence.


Come prepared

In addition to using nerves to your benefit, coming to each meeting well-prepared is the single most effective way to ease performance pressures.


When planning for a sales meeting, the first thing to prioritize is gathering information about a prospective client. By understanding the market and the individuals you’ll be speaking to, you are less likely to be caught off-guard.


These early preparations can include taking a thorough look at a company’s website; reading all company news, blogs, and articles; finding out who will be representing the company at the meeting and researching them on social media; or investigating where the company sits in its respective industry. And, finding your rapport-building hook will pay massive dividends in establishing a common thread.


Make small, achievable goals

Once the meeting starts, it's often easy to become engulfed by your own thoughts. Any salesperson wants to have a good first meeting, but getting preoccupied by the overall outcome can set you back to square one.


A great tip that has helped me in my own career is making small goals you can keep track of throughout the meeting. This can be as simple as nailing your intro and laying out the agenda for the meeting. By completing this goal, you will build momentum and confidence which can carry throughout the rest of the meeting.


Keeping these steps in mind when you approach a stressful situation should help. Just as learning from your own stress levels and using them to improve your performance can make a real difference long-term.


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